The 4 Pillars of the Leadership Definition

The 4 Pillars of the Leadership Definition

Defining leadership can sometimes lead us to a territory where there are negative connotations such as:

  • Obedience
  • Hierarchy
  • Chain of command

For this reason, it is convenient to transmit this definition of leadership to the management teams from the most human aspect, especially considering its four basic pillars:

  • Transparency
  • Shared responsibility
  • Team
  • Growth

1. Transparency in leadership

The good leader must share all the information with his team. We live in the information era, not doing so would be a mistake. Not having the shared performance indicators, nor opening your agenda, would result in a failure. It is essential to share the information so that everyone involved in achieving an objective is clear about their purpose.

2. Shared responsibility

The leader must assume his responsibility, but at the same time share it with his team. Each of its members, beyond executing tasks, should feel responsible for their performance.

Shared responsibility allows the team to be autonomous and turn their work area into something they own. As a leader, you must supervise, help, encourage, but offer enough space for their self-management.

3. Team

A leader without a team is nothing, it’s the team who can grow the scope of the project. The leader, meanwhile, will be able to delegate, manage and make their members progress.

Identify which activities are worth more resources to progress. In a team, as in any other field, we can apply the Pareto rule of 80/20. 20% of the team’s efforts will produce 80% of the results. It is important to be clear about that part to make this team grow and be more efficient.

4. Growth

Ultimately, growth is the key to success. A project with those expectations requires a leader. It is therefore essential that his or her performance makes the project progress to the fullest, with transparency, shared responsibility and supporting the team.

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